Monkeypox is a contagious disease caused by the monkeypox virus, also known as orthopoxvirus. There is an outbreak in New York City.

Monkeypox spreads through close, intimate contact between people. This means anyone can get monkeypox. However, based on the current outbreak, certain populations are being affected by monkeypox more than others, including men who have sex with men (MSM). 

Monkeypox spreads through:

  • Direct contact with the rash or sores of someone who has the virus
  • Touching clothing, bedding, and other items used by someone with monkeypox
  • Respiratory droplets passed during face-to-face contact

It is not known if monkeypox can spread through semen or vaginal fluids.

If you have a new or unexpected rash or other symptoms of monkeypox, contact a doctor or other health care provider. If you do not have a doctor or other health care provider, visit the Find a Doctor page.

Online

Learn more about monkeypox.

By Text

Text MONKEYPOX to 692-692 to get the latest updates about vaccination appointments and other monkeypox information from Notify NYC.

Text MONKEYPOXESP to 692-692 to get the same updates in Spanish.

By Phone

Call 311 for assistance.

 

 

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Vaccination is an important tool in preventing the spread of monkeypox. However, since the current vaccine supply is limited, consider temporarily changing some behaviors that may increase your risk of being exposed. This will help slow the spread of monkeypox until more vaccines are available.

The best way to protect yourself from monkeypox is to avoid sex and other intimate contact with multiple or anonymous partners. 

More information about monkeypox prevention is available online. You can also talk with a nurse by phone.

Online

Learn how to protect yourself and others from monkeypox.

By Phone

Call 311 for assistance.

 

 

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Symptoms usually start seven to 14 days after exposure. In some cases they may not appear for up to 21 days.

The most common symptom is a rash or sores that look like pimples or blisters. These may be all over your body or only on certain parts, such as the face, hands, or feet. The rash or sores may also be inside your mouth, genitals, or anus. Symptoms can last for two to four weeks.

Before or when the rash appears, you may have flu-like symptoms. This includes fever, swollen lymph nodes, headache, and tiredness. In some cases, monkeypox can cause severe illness.

Experiencing Symptoms

If you start experiencing symptoms, even if they are mild, isolate from others immediately and talk to your health care provider. They will check your symptoms and may order testing.

You can talk with a nurse by phone if you don't have a health care provider.

Call 311 for assistance by phone.

 

 

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You should only get tested for monkeypox if you are experiencing symptoms. Testing involves a provider taking a swab of a sore.

If you have a new or unexpected rash or other symptoms of monkeypox, you should see a doctor or other health care provider for testing. They will check your symptoms and may order testing.  The Health Department does not provide monkeypox testing.

Only your doctor or health care provider — not the Health Department — can give you the test result. While you are waiting for your test result, which can take a few days, isolate from others.

You can talk with a nurse by phone if you don’t have a health care provider and want some advice on how to find a healthcare provider who can do testing for Monkeypox.

Call 311 for assistance by phone.

 

 

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The monkeypox vaccine is available for New Yorkers meeting certain eligibility requirements.

Vaccination is free and available regardless of immigration status. This vaccine has been approved by the FDA for the prevention of monkeypox in people ages 18 and older.

Visit nyc.gov/health/monkeypox for the latest updates about monkeypox vaccines.

Eligibility

Anyone can get and spread monkeypox. Eligibility has so far been limited to people who meet certain conditions.

    People who meet at least one of the following criteria are eligible to be vaccinated:

    • People who are 18 and older who have had multiple or anonymous sex partners in the last 14 days and identify as at least one of the following:
      • A man (cisgender or transgender) who has sex with cis or transgender men or transgender women
      • Transgender, gender non-conforming, or gender non-binary (regardless of the gender of your sex partners)
    • Sex workers and anyone engaging in survival sex or any other type of transactional sex (for example, sex in exchange for shelter, food, money, and other goods) of any sexual orientation or gender identity.

    Eligibility may change as the outbreak evolves and vaccine supply changes.

    Close Contacts

    If you have been informed by the Health Department that you are a close contact of someone who has monkeypox, do not make a vaccination appointment yourself. The Health Department will provide you with instructions about where to get vaccinated.

    Experiencing Symptoms

    People who have a fever, rash, or sores that may be monkeypox cannot get vaccinated. Instead, they should separate from others and contact a doctor or other health care provider. If you do not have a doctor or other health care provider, visit the Find a Doctor page.

    Vaccination Appointments

    You do not need an appointment to get the monkeypox vaccine, though appointments are still recommended.

    Appointments can be scheduled online or by phone.

    To prove your identity and age, you must bring one of the following to your vaccination appointment:

    • Driver’s license or non-driver ID
    • IDNYC
    • Birth certificate issued by a state or local government
    • Current U.S. passport or valid foreign passport
    • Permanent resident card
    • Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship
    • Life insurance policy with birthdate
    • Marriage certificate with birthdate

    Online

    Visit vax4nyc.nyc.gov/monkeypox for a list of walk-in vaccine sites or to schedule an appointment.

    By Phone

    • Agency: Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
    • Division: Vaccine Reservation Call Center
    • Phone Number: (877) 829-4692
    • Business Hours: 24 hours, 7 days a week

    Second Doses

    Second doses are now available to anyone who received their first dose at least 28 days ago.

    You will start to build protection in the days and weeks after your first dose, but you will not have full immunity from the vaccine until two weeks after the second dose. 

    New York City is currently prioritizing first doses to get more people protected and help stop the spread while the vaccine supply remains low. 

    Vaccine Questions and Concerns

    You should speak to your doctor if you got the monkeypox vaccine and are having side effects.

    If you do not have a doctor or other health care provider, you can speak with a nurse by phone if you have questions or concerns about vaccine side effects. Nurses can also answer questions about eligibility requirements for the vaccine.

    Call 311 for assistance by phone.

     

     

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    There is no specific treatment approved for monkeypox. Most people get well on their own without treatment.

    There is an antiviral medicine for some people who have tested positive for Monkeypox. Talk to your doctor or other health care provider about getting the medicine.

    You can talk with a nurse by phone if you want some advice on how to find a health care provider who can prescribe the medicine.

    Call 311 for assistance by phone.

     

     

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    The Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has a dedicated phone line for use by doctors, nurses, and other health care providers.

    If you are a doctor, nurse, or other health care provider, you can get information about monkeypox, including:

    • Risks
    • Symptoms
    • Testing
    • Treatment

    You can also report a possible case of monkeypox.

    If you want to order materials about monkeypox, including posters and palm cards, visit the Health and Mental Hygiene Literature page instead.

    Call 311 for assistance by phone.

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