The often fatal Ebola virus is spread through broken skin or through your eyes, nose, or mouth if they are in direct contact with the body fluids of a person sick with Ebola. It cannot be spread through the air or simply by being near someone who is infected. 

Bodily fluids can include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Blood
  • Vomit
  • Urine
  • Feces
  • Sweat
  • Breast Milk
  • Semen

The disease usually starts with an abrupt fever, possibly with headache and joint and muscle aches anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure. People only become contagious after they begin to have symptoms, such as fever.

Symptoms of Ebola include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Fever
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal (stomach) pain
  • Unexplained hemorrhage (bleeding or bruising)

The disease usually starts with an abrupt fever, possibly with headache and joint and muscle aches anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure. People only become contagious after they begin to have symptoms, such as fever.

Ebola has been eradicated in some countries. There are no current reports of Ebola in the United States.

Get more information about Ebola.

    There have not been any reports of dogs or cats having symptoms of Ebola or making other people sick with Ebola.

    The risk of a pet in the U.S. being exposed to Ebola is extremely low, but if a pet were exposed, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that it be evaluated by public health officials and a veterinarian.

    Get more information on transmission and pets.

    City and State officials have been working to ensure hospitals and first responders have adequate supplies and training to safely and effectively care for patients with Ebola.

    Health care workers have been provided with personal protective equipment and trained in treatment protocols that were established with guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Workers will be safe from infection when caring for Ebola patients if they strictly follow these guidelines.

    Five City hospitals have been designated as primary treatment centers for Ebola. Bellevue Hospital Center is ready to manage potential Ebola cases.

    The following other hospitals are nearly ready to be primary treatments centers for Ebola:

    • Montefiore Medical Center
    • Mount Sinai
    • New York Presbyterian
    • North Shore at Glen Cove