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Residents and businesses can get information about the proper disposal of used cooking oil and grease.

When cooking grease, wipes, and other items get flushed down drains or toilets, they can clog residential sewer pipes. Even items that are labeled "flushable" may not clear pipes or break down in the sewer system or a wastewater treatment plant.

This mix of personal hygiene products and grease can create "fatbergs" in our sewers and can lead to more flooding, sewer backups, damage to pipes and treatment plants, and high repair costs.

You can learn more about how to dispose of commercial cooking oil and grease properly.

Online

Learn more about disposing of grease at home.

By Phone

Call 311 for assistance.

When cooking grease, wipes, and other items get flushed down drains or toilets, they can clog commercial sewer pipes. Even items that are labeled "flushable" may not clear pipes or break down in the sewer system or a wastewater treatment plant.

This mix of personal hygiene products and grease can create "fatbergs" in our sewers and can lead to more flooding, sewer backups, damage to pipes and treatment plants, and high repair costs.

You can learn more about how to dispose of commercial cooking oil and grease properly.

Online

Learn more about disposing of commercial grease.

By Phone

Call 311 for assistance.

Flushable

When a product is labeled "flushable" it generally means that it will clear the toilet bowl. It does not mean it will definitely clear pipes or break down in the sewer system or at a wastewater treatment plant. Water and wastewater utilities around the world have found a significant increase of wipes in their sewer pipes and at their plants.

Truly flushable items are ones that: break into small pieces quickly, are not buoyant, and only contain materials which will readily degrade in a range of natural environments (like paper, not plastic).

Fatberg

The word "fatberg" combines the words "fat" and "iceberg" to describe the masses of congealed grease and personal hygiene products that can linger in sewer systems. This mix of personal hygiene products and grease can create "fatbergs" in our sewers.

In an effort to reduce clogging and blockages in the New York City sewer and pipe system, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) is coordinating a public education campaign to encourage New Yorkers to "Trash It. Don't Flush It."

You can learn more about the campaign online by going to DEP's website.

Learn more about the "Trash It. Don't Flush It." campaign.