You can file an overcharge complaint about a business in New York City.

An overcharge is when a business:

  • Charges you too much money (price gouging)
  • Posts one price and charges you more than the posted price

The City does not set prices. You must beware and shop around for the best prices.

What You Need

To file a complaint, you must provide:

  • The vendor's Consumer Affairs or Health license number
  • A receipt

What Happens Next

To receive follow up on your request, you must provide your address. The Agency will mail you a complaint form, which you must complete and return. If you also provide an email address with your Service Request, you will receive the form by email instead. Be sure to check your spam folder in addition to your inbox.

The Agency will consider your complaint a tip if you do not provide your address.

On May 21, 2022, the City of New York declared a state of emergency related to the shortage of supply in infant formula. Emergency Executive Order 98 puts into immediate effect the City’s price gouging rule, which makes price gouging illegal for any product essential to health, safety, or welfare during a declared state of emergency in the City of New York.

Businesses selling infant formula cannot charge 10% or more above the price available to consumers 30 to 60 days before the state of emergency.

If you think a store, including an online business, significantly increased the price of infant formula, you can file an overcharge complaint.

If you are struggling to find formula for your family, visit the Parenting Support page for information and resources.

In 2020, the Department of Consumer and Worker Protection announced a permanent price gouging rule under the City’s Consumer Protection Law. The rule makes price gouging illegal for any product essential to health, safety, or welfare during a declared state of emergency in the City of New York.

Examples include:

  • Staple food items (milk, bread, eggs)
  • Emergency supplies (water, flashlights, batteries)
  • Diagnostic products and services (test kits, thermometers)
  • Disinfectants (wipes, liquids, sprays)
  • Face masks
  • Gloves
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Medicines
  • Paper towels
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Soap
  • Gasoline

It is illegal to increase the prices of these types of goods and services by 10% or more.

If you think a store, including an online business or a street vendor, excessively increased the price of these items beginning in June 2020, you can file an overcharge complaint with the City.

If you suspect fraud or deceptive practices by businesses who provide inspection, sampling, cleaning, or disinfection services for cooling towers, you may file a complaint with the New York State Office of the Attorney General.

Use the Consumer Frauds Bureau Online Complaint Form.

The Department of Consumer and Worker Protection does not accept reports of rude employee behavior. You should report this type of complaint to the business.

For reports of discrimination, go to the Discrimination page.

The New York City Department of Consumer and Worker Protection can help you with complaints about businesses in New York City. For complaints about businesses elsewhere, contact the local Consumer Affairs office or the State Attorney General's office.

Online

Learn how to file a complaint for a business outside of NYC.

By Phone

  • Agency: Suffolk County Consumer Affairs
  • Phone Number: (631) 853-4600
  • Business Hours: Monday - Friday: 9 AM - 5 PM

  • Agency: Westchester County Department of Consumer Protection
  • Phone Number: (914) 995-2155
  • Business Hours: Monday - Friday: 9 AM - 5 PM

  • Agency: New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs
  • Phone Number: (973) 504-6200
  • Business Hours: Monday - Friday: 9 AM - 5 PM

  • Agency: Nassau County Consumer Affairs
  • Phone Number: (516) 571-2600
  • Business Hours: Monday - Friday: 9 AM - 5 PM

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