You can apply for benefits that can help you save on your property tax bill.

New York City and New York State offer homeowners property tax relief in the form of exemptions, abatements, and credits. Eligibility criteria for each program is different. You may qualify to receive more than one benefit.

Exemptions

Your property’s assessed value is one of the factors used to calculate how much property tax you owe each year. Exemptions reduce your property’s assessed value before the dollar amount of taxes owed is calculated. This reduced value, when multiplied by the tax rate, lowers the amount of taxes that you owe.

The Annual Notice of Property Value (NOPV) you receive in January lists the exemptions you are granted for the upcoming tax year and will see on your bill.

Abatements

Abatements reduce your taxes after they've been calculated by applying credits to the dollar amount of taxes owed. Abatements aren’t listed on the Annual Notice of Property Value (NOPV), but any granted abatements will appear on your property tax bill. If you own a condo or are a co-op shareholder, your managing agent or board of directors will receive a tax benefit breakdown report that will reflect your abatement amount.

Credits

Credits may be applied to your taxes or be given to you as a refund check.

The New York State Real Property Tax Credit, also known as the Circuit Breaker Tax Credit, is a refundable credit that you claim when filing your income taxes.

For more information, you can consult your tax professional or get information from the State.

Online

Visit the Department of Taxation and Finance website.

Phone

  • Agency: New York State Department of Taxation and Finance
  • Phone Number: (518) 457-5181
  • Business Hours: Monday - Friday: 8 AM - 5 PM
  • Staff is available through the automated phone system during business hours. Automated assistance is also available in Cantonese, Mandarin, Russian, and Spanish.

The Clergy Exemption provides up to a $1,500 property tax exemption to eligible clergy members, retired clergy members, or unremarried spouses of deceased clergy members.

To keep receiving the benefit, you must file a new application every year.

Visit the Clergy Property Tax Exemption page to learn how to apply.

Property owners and developers may be eligible for tax incentives if they:

  • Build new residential properties
  • Renovate existing properties to create residential units
  • Make certain enhancements or improvements to residential properties

Programs include:

  • 421a Exemption
  • Green Roof Abatement
  • J-51 Program
  • Major Capital Improvement (MCI) Abatement

Visit the Residential Construction Tax Benefit Programs page to learn how to apply.

Co-op and condo unit owners are eligible for a property tax abatement. Building management, boards of directors, or other official representatives must apply for the co-op or condo abatement on behalf of the eligible building units.

To be eligible, the unit must be your primary residence.

Visit the Co-op and Condo Property Tax Abatement page to learn how to apply.

The Crime Victim or Good Samaritan Exemption provides property tax relief to crime victims who have a disability because they were victims of a crime or were trying to prevent a crime.

To be eligible, the home must have been modified to accommodate the owner's special needs due to the disability.

This exemption doesn't need to be renewed.

Visit the Crime Victim Property Tax Exemption page to learn how to apply.

The Disabled Homeowners’ Exemption (DHE) provides a reduction of 5 to 50% on New York City's real property tax to homeowners with disabilities.

To be eligible for DHE, you must have a disability, earn no more than $58,399 for the last calendar year, and the property must be your primary residence.

You must renew every year to continue to receive the benefit.

Visit the Disabled Homeowners' Exemption (DHE) page to learn how to apply.

Homeowners may be eligible for a School Tax Relief (STAR) credit or exemption.

The STAR Credit is offered by New York State in the form of a rebate check. The STAR Exemption is offered by New York City and appears on your property tax bill. You can’t receive both at the same time.

New STAR applicants must apply for the benefit with the State.

You are considered a new STAR applicant if you:

  • Didn't own your property on March 15, 2015, or
  • Didn't have Basic or Enhanced STAR for tax year 2015/2016, or
  • Removed the STAR Exemption from your property so you can receive STAR as a credit instead, or
  • Have a total household income of more than $250,000, but less than $500,000

If you received the NYC STAR Exemption in the 2015/2016 tax year or earlier and later lost it and have a total household income of $250,000 or less, you can choose to either apply to restore your benefit with the City or apply for the STAR Credit with NY State. If you have a total household income more than $250,000, you can only apply for the STAR Credit.

The STAR Credit may offer a greater benefit than the STAR Exemption because the amount of the credit will increase in the future, but the value of the exemption will not.

Visit the School Tax Relief for Homeowners (STAR) page to learn more.

The Senior Citizen Homeowners' Exemption (SCHE) provides a reduction of 5 to 50% on New York City's real property tax to seniors age 65 and older.

To be eligible for SCHE, you must be 65 or older, earn no more than $58,399 for the last calendar year, and the property must be your primary residence.

The exemption must be renewed every two years.

Visit the Senior Citizen Homeowners' Exemption (SCHE) page to learn how to apply.

The Veterans Exemption helps veterans and their family members reduce their property taxes.

To be eligible, the property must be your primary residence and you must be:

  • A veteran who served during one of the Qualified Service periods of war or conflict
  • The spouse of a qualified veteran
  • The surviving spouse of a qualified veteran who has not remarried
  • A Gold Star parent (the parent of a child who died in the line of duty while serving during one of the Qualified Service periods)
  • The registered domestic partner of a qualified veteran

Visit the Veterans Property Tax Exemption page to learn how to apply.

The NYC Residential Property Taxes booklet provides information for homeowners about:

  • How to pay your property tax bill
  • How property values are determined and how you can dispute your property's value
  • Exemption benefits and requirements
  • The difference between exemptions and abatements
  • The terms used on property tax bills and Notices of Property Value (NOPV)
  • How the City spends its tax dollars

You can download the guide online or request a paper copy by mail.

Tax Class 1

This guide is for 1- to 3-family homes.

Online

Download the property tax guide for Class 1.

Download the property tax guide for Class 1 in Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, French, Haitian Creole, Korean, Polish, RussianSpanish, or Urdu.

By Mail

Call 311 to request a paper copy.

Tax Class 2

This guide is for residential properties with more than 3 units, including cooperatives and condominiums.

Online

Download the property tax guide for Class 2.

Download the property tax guide for Class 2 in Chinese, Korean, Russian, or Spanish.

By Mail

Call 311 to request a paper copy.